The Hunting Report
HomeF.A.QContact Us\View Your Shopping Cart

Questions or Need Help Related to The Hunting Report Newsletter.
Call us at 800-272-5656 or 305-253-5301
Search:

HuntingReport.com

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Trophy Hunters Africa Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 7001 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: June 16, 2008 to June 27, 2008
Place of Hunt: South Africa - Eastern Cape
Hunt Area: Zulu Natal


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Trophy Hunters Africa. PO Box 123; Bethulie; O.F.S; 9992; South Africa; Tel. 011-27-0-51-6530294;
Personal Guide (if any): Tim Rudman
Booking Agent (if any):
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Nyala - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Good.
Eland - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Good.
Sable - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Good.
Tsessebe - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Excellent.
Suni - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Good.
Duiker - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Good.
Springbok - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: White springbok. Good.
Zebra - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Good.
Game Sought But Not Taken: Kudu - Availability: Bad shot.
Game Condition Comments: Excellent.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Excellent Guide/PH Ability: Excellent
Condition of Camp: Excellent Condition of Equipment: Excellent
Quality of Food: Excellent Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: Delta Airline Service: Good
Airline Comments:


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Amount: $0
Trophy Fees: Amount: $0
Permits/Licenses: Amount: $0
Commercial Airfares: Amount: $0
Charter Airfares: Amount: $0
Other Costs: Amount: $0
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt:
Highlights of Hunt: Being with family in South Africa.
Equipment Recommendations:
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? Yes
Why? Great PH, excellent equipment, superior staff support.


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Clay Murphy
Contact Information: Tel. 501-223-2400 - 132 Hickory Creek Circle, Little Rock, AK 72212 E-mail: cmurphy@inscntr.com
Hunting Experience: All my life.
Physical Condition: Poor.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL
It was a short hunt but Tim Rudman exceeded my expectations in all respects.If there was a decision Tim made it in my favor.If there was an error Tim made it in my favor.If there was a bill to be paid Tim billed it in my favor.If my wife, daughter or I needed anything,like flowers for a birthday party,he got it.How I do not know or care. This was my first hunt with Tim.I had several friends who recommended him and I was more than pleased. All animals taken were trophy and tasted great. I never thought you could mess up an eland filet but it happened this trip.A chef at one of the lodges decided to serve my wife,daughter and a friend eland with a blueberry chocolate sauce to hide the gamey taste.Tim's reply when told the story later that night promply replied"What no ice cream?" The tsessebee was exceptional.The eland's hairdo and dewkao qualify him as a "proper bull". My suni had his right horn growing into his skull. We had a great time.

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Trophy Hunters Africa Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 2261 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: March 6, 2001 to March 27, 2001
Place of Hunt: South Africa - Kwazulunatal and East Cape
Hunt Area: Lulubush, Oedefontein, and Springfontein


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Trophy Hunters Africa. PO Box 123; Bethulie; O.F.S; 9992; South Africa; Tel. 011-27-0-51-6530294;
Personal Guide (if any): Tim Rudman
Booking Agent (if any):
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Leopard - Availability: Average - Trophy Size: 17 3/16, gold.
Bontebok - Availability: Average - Trophy Size: 44 3/8, gold, handgun.
Blesbok - Availability: Average - Trophy Size: 46 5/8, gold, white blesbok, handgun.
Reedbuck - Availability: Average - Trophy Size: 23 3/8 common reedbuck, handgun.
Reedbuck - Availability: Average - Trophy Size: 13 2/8, silver, mountain reedbuck, handgun.
Rhebok, Vaal - Availability: Average - Trophy Size: 19.
Game Sought But Not Taken: Bushpig - Availability: Food was abundant so they were not coming to bait.
Game Condition Comments: It was early in season and game was in great shape. I saw huge nyala in large numbers, all high gold. No duiker due to leopard activity in Natal.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Excellent Guide/PH Ability: Excellent
Condition of Camp: Excellent Condition of Equipment: Excellent
Quality of Food: Excellent Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: Delta and South African Air Airline Service: Excellent
Airline Comments: Delta hassle over checking in third bag.


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Leopard package. Amount: $8950
Trophy Fees: $3,690 less leopard. Amount: $0
Permits/Licenses: Included. Amount: $0
Commercial Airfares: Amount: $1550
Charter Airfares: Amount: $0
Other Costs: $294 VAT on daily rate and $100 for Phasa conservation fund donation. Amount: $394
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt: Heat, 105 F and 100 percent humidity. It was really tough. Get in shape if you want to hunt for Vaal rhebok at 5,000 to 7,000 feet and steep.
Highlights of Hunt: Taking a huge leopard, about number 17. Thrilling hunt. Taking three top ten with a handgun.
Equipment Recommendations: 30-SPF lotion and strong DEET (heavy ticks).
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? Yes
Why? Tim is the best and always delivers.


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Sam Maxwell
Contact Information: Tel. 425-455-2587 - 933 111th Place, S.E. Bellevue, WA 98004
Hunting Experience: I have been hunting in Canada, U.S., Australia, South Africa, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and Zambia. I have been on seven safaris in Africa.
Physical Condition: Excellent even though I am recovering from a heart virus. I am 68 years old.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL
I have never seen a worst airport than Joberg. I have watched it steadily go down hill over the past eight years, despite many physical improvements. I arrived three and a half hours ahead of time and barely made my flight due to hassles over third bags, round and round guns checking, and paying $100 rand fee. Three gate changes from one end of the airport to the other. A 45-minute line through customs/immigration with hundreds of people and four out of 16 positions manned. What used to be a smooth orderly process is in shambles. I will not fly through there again. Also an employee told me that three major carriers are pulling out, including British Air. I understand Port Elizabeth will become an International airport soon. Heads up get there very early.

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Trophy Hunters Africa Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 1639 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: April 15, 2000 to May 13, 2000
Place of Hunt: South Africa - Natal, Kwazulu
Hunt Area: Mkuzi


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Trophy Hunters Africa. PO Box 123; Bethulie; O.F.S; 9992; South Africa; Tel. 011-27-0-51-6530294;
Personal Guide (if any):
Booking Agent (if any): Dale Hedgpeth; Hedgpeths Adventures In Hunting. 14216 110th Avenue Court East; Puyallup; WA; 98374; Tel. 253-770-0595; Fax: 253-845-3306;Email: safaris@sprintmail.com; Web www.adventuresinhunting.com
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Rhinoceros - Availability: Scarce - Trophy Size: Tranquilized. SCI record book.
Game Sought But Not Taken:
Game Condition Comments: Rhino was declared in excellent condition by the veternarian who provided the chemicals used. It will not be darted again for over a year or more.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Excellent Guide/PH Ability: Excellent
Condition of Camp: Excellent Condition of Equipment: Excellent
Quality of Food: Excellent Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: Delta and South African Air Airline Service:
Airline Comments: No major problems. Minor delays on Delta. They also misdirected rifles on trip home. They were delivered to my home 12 hours later.


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Total cost of rhino darting safari. Amount: $8000
Trophy Fees: Amount: $0
Permits/Licenses: Amount: $0
Commercial Airfares: Schedule fares. Amount: $0
Charter Airfares: Amount: $0
Other Costs: Tips. Amount: $0
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt: None.
Highlights of Hunt: Shooting a tranquilizer dart into a rhino from 30 yards.
Equipment Recommendations: Be sure to use plenty of tick repellent.
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? Yes
Why?


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: David Fogg
Contact Information: Tel. 253-588-9132 - 11204 Lake Steilacoom Drive, Tacoma, WA 98498
Hunting Experience: I have been on 11 African hunts, four South Pacific hunts and numerous hunts in the United States and Canada.
Physical Condition: Good considering that I am past 80.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL
The main purpose of this safari was to shoot a rhino with a tranquilizer dart. We were allowed five days under the price shed. The rhino was located and stalked the first day. I was able to hit it from 30 yards.

Rhinos are very spooky and a very careful stalk is necessary. If you miss, the rhino will be out of sight in seconds and very difficult to track and relocate due to the terrain. The rhino can only be down less than an hour. It is given an antidote shot after measuring, photographing, ear marking and examining quickly. The animal is back on its feet in about 90 seconds.

I believe this hunt to be more interesting and exciting than killing a rhino and for sure less expensive.

We spent another two weeks hunting other species with considerable success.

I was very pleased with this safari and can recommend it.

The dart is shot from a single shot H.O.R. rifle, .50 cal. The propellant is a .22 blank in an auxiliary cartridge. The trajectory is like a rainbow and maximum range allowed is 30 yards.

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Trophy Hunters Africa Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 1712 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: August 1, 1999 to August 26, 1999
Place of Hunt: Zambia -
Hunt Area:


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Trophy Hunters Africa. PO Box 123; Bethulie; O.F.S; 9992; South Africa; Tel. 011-27-0-51-6530294;
Personal Guide (if any): Tim Rudman and Charle Nalikenyi
Booking Agent (if any):
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Puku - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Average.
Game Sought But Not Taken: Duiker - Availability: Yellow back duiker. Did not see any and I think we spent too much time hunting other species that were not on my list for Zambia.
Game Condition Comments: The condition of all the game seen was excellent.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Excellent Guide/PH Ability: Good
Condition of Camp: Excellent Condition of Equipment: Fair
Quality of Food: Excellent Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: South African Airways Airline Service: Excellent
Airline Comments:


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Amount: $6425
Trophy Fees: For puku Amount: $550
Permits/Licenses: Included. Amount: $0
Commercial Airfares: $4,900 round trip business class and in country $450. Amount: $5350
Charter Airfares: $940 lodging fees, immigration and passing fees plus 26 hours at $85 per hour. Amount: $2210
Other Costs: Travel/observer $840, airport fares $45, Harris House $200, gifts $50; Zambia visa $300. Amount: $1435
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt: Promised main camp but had to use fly camp at top price and there maybe a problem obtaining trophy fees for species not hunted.
Highlights of Hunt:
Equipment Recommendations: Cold weather gear that can be layered.
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? Yes
Why? If commercial and ground transportation is used, more time will be required


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Gilbert E. Orr
Contact Information: Tel. 408-683-4863 - PO Box 870, San Martin, CA 95046-0870
Hunting Experience: I have taken 21 trips to Africa, three trips to Australia, six trips to Canada and numberous North American hunts outside California. I have also hunted in New Zealand, New Guinea.
Physical Condition: Good.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL
(Editor note: This item belonges to a longer subscriber report that deals with three countries, Zambia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. If you would like to order these reports, please contact us and ask for items number 1713 and 1714.)

I first contacted Tim Rudman in 1997, on a recommendation from a friend of mine, Mr. Richard D'anglo. I wanted to hunt eleven (11), different species located in South Africa, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The Zimbabwe part of the original hunt was conducted in 1999 with Steve Schwarer at Bangala Safaris. This hunt report has been completed and filed with The Hunting Report. This hunt was to be taken in 1998, but due to medical problems I had to reschedule the event(s), with Steve Schwarer and Tim Rudman.

The 1999 Safari Club International (SCI), convention allowed Mr. Rudman and myself to put together this safari for yellowback duiker, black-faced impala, Damara dik-dik, puku, vaal rhebok, blue duiker, and the genet cat. These animals are located in the three (3), countries listed above, and we scheduled time in each country to hunt the indidgous animals. I also indicated that if time were available I would like to hunt a cheetah.

I arrived in South Africa early to take care of some business matters. After that, Tim Rudman and I got together the evening before the start of the safari at the Harris Place in Pretoria, South Africa. Early the next morning, a friend of Tim's picked us up, and drove us, along with our equipment, to the General Aviation Airport. There I met Mr. Jan Marias (P.O. Box 1693, Fairy Glenn 0043, RSA), the pilot of a single engine aircraft -- a Cherokee 6. We had to wait until RSA customs went to work so that the guns and passports could be cleared. When this occurred we were off to Lusaka, Zambia, the first location of our hunt. There was a stop for refueling at Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, and believe me, since a Cherokee 6 does not have facilities it could not have arrived any later than it did. The landing fee was $33.00 USD, and there were no exit duties to be paid, because we did not stay in Zimbabwe for more than twenty-four (24), hours.

After refueling, we flew on to Lusaka, Zambia. Upon arriving at Lusaka we met Mr. Joe Chalansi of Sofarms Safari's (P.O. Box 35559, Lusaka, Zambia), and the former concession owner, Mr. Ray Milligan. These individuals helped us clear passport control, plus customs, along with the gun permits. There was some problem with the route to take to the hunt area. This hunt area was on the northern edge of Kafuee Flats -- Lushimba hunt area. The flight, in a round about manner, took an hour and a half to arrive at a dirt strip that was being prepared for other aircrafts coming to a meeting later in the week. After unloading our aircraft, the road grader operator carried our equipment and us to the main camp. The main camp was within a strong arm's throw of the dirt strip. Low and behold, there was another hunting party at the main camp. Tim Rudman was informed prior to the hunt that we would have exclusive use of this camp for the requested time. This was verified in writing by way of FAX and again at the Lusaka, Zambia airport. That night of arrival, after the vehicle was repaired, we spent three (3), hours traveling to the fly camp. This fly camp was not completely setup when we arrived. The crew that was stationed there did a magnificent job to make my stay as pleasant as possible. When we departed the camp it was functioning at 100 percent. This was a very good crew. The guide assigned to my safari did not appear until the morning of the following day. His name was Charles Nalikenga. I was after two (2) animals, a puku, and a yellowback duiker. Tim thoughtfully obtained permits for a red lechwe, blue duiker, and a sitatingua, in addition to the two (2), species I desired to hunt. The trophy fees had to be paid in advance, and those species of animals not collected results in a refund of the unused trophy fees. There maybe a situation as a result of the non refund of the unused trophy fees. The daily rate for the guide service is $850.00 USD per day. If the main camp had been used, then no question. However, since the fly camp was used, I think the daily rate was too high. Also, without the presence of Tim Rudman, we would still be trying to reach camp, due to the very poor condition of the vehicles in camp. Tim fixed the rotor such that contact was made in the distributor cap during engine operation. I never would have thought to use this technique. If the aircraft pilot rode along in the vehicle, then I was charged $120.00 USD per day.

The safari itself produced a record book puku, and two (2) shots at two (2) blue duikers, which I missed because I did not realize the actual size of the specie, and when they view you straight on, it is very difficult to pull it out of the bush to get a good clean shot at the animal. Unknown to me at the time, was the fact that the Sawarovski scope mounted on my 300 Win Mag was broken. The cross hairs had severed their connection at the top, and left side. This situation was only identifiable when the scope was at its highest power, and I always use the scope set at a power less than maximum. The setting is usually around 4 power.

We never did see a yellowback duiker, and we wasted a couple of days, of the seven (7), day safari hunting red lechwe and sitatunga, which turned out to have horn sizes equal to those I have already bagged. The hunting area had more than adequate water and habitat. We saw lions, leopards, cheetahs, and many other species of animals in this area. I do think that to hunt the yellowback duiker, you need more than seven (7) days and other hunt camps to hunt these species.

After seven (7) days, the last two- (2) days were spent at the main camp, we departed this paradise for Lusaka. I left a tip of $150.00 USD, to be equally divided by the fly camp crew. The landing fee was $8.00 USD, and the departure tax was $20.00 USD. The flight took an extra hour due to the head winds.

This year's safari was supposed to complete the attaining of all the species of animals from the northern boundary of Zambia to Cape Town, South Africa. I have hunted all of the species, but am lacking three (3) to complete my goal. These three are the yellowback duiker, crocodile and civet cat.

There were mistakes, oversights, etc done that should not have been allowed. My Sawarovski riflescope was broken from the start, but the only way to detect the problem was to adjust the power to maximum and look through it. The top and left side mounting points for the cross hairs had broken. At maximum power these points are fully visible and the cross hairs wobble when the rifle moves. This problem cost me money that I should not have had to spend. Another point is the yellowback duiker requires more study to determine good location, quantity available, time needed to be reasonably assured of completing the hunt, and can toy horns be reasonably used to complete the task, or should the leaves of a certain plant be used to be successful.

Overall, I have to say this hunt was good, and I would recommend it to my friends.

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Trophy Hunters Africa Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 1713 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: August 1, 1999 to August 26, 1999
Place of Hunt: Namibia -
Hunt Area:


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Trophy Hunters Africa. PO Box 123; Bethulie; O.F.S; 9992; South Africa; Tel. 011-27-0-51-6530294;
Personal Guide (if any): Tim Rudman and Charle Nalikenyi
Booking Agent (if any):
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Impala - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Average blackfaced impala.
Dik-Dik - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Very good Damara dik-dik.
Game Sought But Not Taken:
Game Condition Comments: The condition of all the game seen was excellent.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Excellent Guide/PH Ability: Excellent
Condition of Camp: Excellent Condition of Equipment: Excellent
Quality of Food: Excellent Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: South African Airways Airline Service: Excellent
Airline Comments:


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Amount: $1500
Trophy Fees: $950 Damara dik-dik, black faced impala $2,000. Amount: $2950
Permits/Licenses: Included. Amount: $0
Commercial Airfares: $4,900 round trip business class and $450 in country. Amount: $5350
Charter Airfares: $940 immigaration and pass fee and 26 hous at $85 per hour. Amount: $3150
Other Costs: Amount: $0
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt:
Highlights of Hunt: Shooting impala with a broken rifle scope. Also the taking of a Damara dik-dik with a 22LR in heavy cover with one shot.
Equipment Recommendations: Cold weather gear that can be layered.
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? Yes
Why? If commercial and ground transportation is used more time will be required.


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Gilbert E. Orr
Contact Information: Tel. 408-683-4863 - PO Box 870, San Martin, CA 95046-0870
Hunting Experience: I have taken 21 trips to Africa, three trips to Australia, six trips to Canada and numerous North American hunts outside California. I have also hunted in New Zealand and New Guinea.
Physical Condition: Good.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL
(Editor note: This item belonges to a longer subscriber report that deals with three countries, Zambia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. If you would like to order these reports, please contact us and ask for items number 1712 and 1714.)

I first contacted Tim Rudman in 1997, on a recommendation from a friend of mine, Mr. Richard D'anglo. I wanted to hunt eleven (11), different species located in South Africa, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The Zimbabwe part of the original hunt was conducted in 1999 with Steve Schwarer at Bangala Safaris. This hunt report has been completed and filed with The Hunting Report. This hunt was to be taken in 1998, but due to medical problems I had to reschedule the event(s), with Steve Schwarer and Tim Rudman.

The 1999 Safari Club International (SCI), convention allowed Mr. Rudman and myself to put together this safari for yellowback duiker, black-faced impala, Damara dik-dik, puku, vaal rhebok, blue duiker, and the genet cat. These animals are located in the three (3), countries listed above, and we scheduled time in each country to hunt the indidgous animals. I also indicated that if time were available I would like to hunt a cheetah.

After clearing passport control, and customs with the firearms, we headed to Namibia. Boy, was this flight an interesting ride. I have a lot of flight time in general aviation aircraft (approximately 5,000 hours). I have never experienced the magnitude of the thermals experienced on this ride. It was not uncommon to be changing altitudes by 2,000 feet in short time periods. It was impossible to hold any altitude. The territory covered I have never seen before, and thought it was quite beautiful to behold. Flying over the ground allows the landscape to change/blend/merge more rapidly than driving thru the same territory. The flight from Lusaka passed through Victory Falls, Zimbabwe, where we refueled, and paid a $33.00 USD landing fee. There was no departure tax, because we did not stay overnight. From Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe, we flew south to Grootsontein, Namibia to clear customs, and obtain the necessary rifle permits. This airport did not have refueling facilities, so we proceeded to Tsumeb. We refueled the aircraft, but it was too late to proceed farther, so we spent the night at the Makalani Hotel. Early the next morning, the hotel owner picked us up, and brought us back to the airport to continue our travels.

The first hunt destination was at Mr. Kasper Gunzel's farm to hunt the blackfaced impala. Mr. Gunzel has a dirt strip on his property. This farm was 50 miles southeast of Grootsontein. We were met at the airstrip, and transported back to the farmhouse where rooms were assigned. We changed into our hunting attire, had some coffee, and sighted in the rifle. We then proceeded to find, and stalk, the largest buck in the herd. These animals have excellent eyesight, and tend to move in a direction away from you using all means of cover to prevent the hunter from making a successful stalk. We spooked them out of some dense bush while on foot. The buck stopped to view what was pursing him, and that is when I placed one shot, a little high, and a little back, from the heart. This was not the aim point. The buck ran for approximately twenty (20) yards before expiring. Pictures were taken, along with the typical German procedure for a successful hunt. The animals, and people, loaded up and proceeded back to the ranch for lunch. The lunch was fabulous. The impala was skinned for a full body mount, and along with the skull, our equipment, Tim, Jan (our pilot), and I were loaded on the airplane for the next portion of the safari.

The next flight was north to about 40 miles south of Tepsha Pan, to a Mr. Gunther Hemstsdt (P.O. Box 422, Outjo, Namibia). Again, the airfield was a dirt strip, with a lot of holes due to animal activities. Prior to our departure, these holes were patched. Upon arrival, we were transported to the land owners facilities for visiting hunters. To say that these facilities were fantastic does not even begin to describe them. The meals, drinks, etc were excellent. And the equipment used on the safari was well maintained, and in excellent working order. The species of animals to be taken was a Damara dik-dik, and possibly a cheetah, if the opportunity presented itself. The dik-dik was to be hunted with a 22 long rifle borrowed from Gunther Hemstadt. It had a set trigger, which was new to me, but firing the weapon on the rifle range got me used to using it. Gunther, Tim, a tracker, and myself climbed into the vehicle to hunt the Damara dik-dik. The drive to the hunt area covered some very beautiful country. The number of animal species was plentiful. The dik-dik hunt area was in the hills. This species of animal is very small, blends into the habitat, and moves through the bush like a ballet dancer. Most of the time the dik-dik were lying under a bush, and watching us approach. When spooked, they traveled 10-20 yards, and stopped to check on us. We made several stalks on these animals, and the second time they moved they would disappear into the bush. It was very difficult to track their footprints, due to the ground, plus their feet are very small, and when moving do not leave tracks that can be easily followed, at least by me. We spotted at least 10-12 dik-dik's, but could not get a shot at any of them. At lunchtime we returned to the facilities for an excellent lunch, and had a short nap.

After a short siesta, we returned to our hunt for the dik-dik. This time we traveled to a water hole on top of one of the ridges. As we were approaching the water hole we spotted a dik-dik. We stopped the vehicle, and started our stalk. This time there was only Gunther and myself. The dik-dik moved into the bush, and kept an eye on us as we approached. I must say that as I approached the dik-dik's location I had trouble spotting him until I saw some movement by the dik-dik. The shot was not easy. It had to be made through a small hole in the bush, over a second strand of fence wire, and I had to make sure there was no branch, or vine, that would deflect the bullet. I fired one shot. The dik-dik jumped straight into the air and departed to his left. I had thought that I had missed, but Gunther informed me that the actions of the dik-dik were proper, and that the animal was wounded. The crew from the vehicle arrived. We located the spot where the animal was hit. There was blood on the ground. Now, I thought, how do we find the animal? The black trackers followed the animal to his death spot. These trackers had to show me the tracks, or I would have missed most of them. We cleaned the animal, took a lot of pictures, and I opted to carry the animal back to the vehicle. The fur on the dik-dik was very soft. The face/jaw etc had cartilage instead of bone. And the weight of the animal is about half the weight of a newborn child. I was awed.

The next three (3) days, and again at 0300 on Sunday, 15 August 1999, was devoted to the cheetah, but none of the baits on the ranch were touched. Calls to the neighbors brought information that signs had been seen, but the cat(s), had not been spotted.

This year's safari was supposed to complete the attaining of all the species of animals from the northern boundary of Zambia to Cape Town, South Africa. I have hunted all of the species, but am lacking three (3) to complete my goal. These three are the yellowback duiker, crocodile and civet cat.

There were mistakes, oversights, etc done that should not have been allowed. My Sawarovski riflescope was broken from the start, but the only way to detect the problem was to adjust the power to maximum and look through it. The top and left side mounting points for the cross hairs had broken. At maximum power these points are fully visible and the cross hairs wobble when the rifle moves. This problem cost me money that I should not have had to spend. Another point is the yellowback duiker requires more study to determine good location, quantity available, time needed to be reasonably assured of completing the hunt, and can toy horns be reasonably used to complete the task, or should the leaves of a certain plant be used to be successful.

Overall, I have to say this hunt was good, and I would recommend it to my friends.

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Trophy Hunters Africa Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 1714 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: August 1, 1999 to August 26, 1999
Place of Hunt: South Africa -
Hunt Area:


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Trophy Hunters Africa. PO Box 123; Bethulie; O.F.S; 9992; South Africa; Tel. 011-27-0-51-6530294;
Personal Guide (if any): Tim Rudman and Charle Nalikenyi
Booking Agent (if any):
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Rhebok, Vaal - Availability: Average - Trophy Size: Average.
Duiker - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Very good blue duiker.
Genet - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Very good spotted genet cat.
Game Sought But Not Taken:
Game Condition Comments: The condition of all of the game seen was excellent


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Excellent Guide/PH Ability: Excellent
Condition of Camp: Excellent Condition of Equipment: Good
Quality of Food: Excellent Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: South African Airways Airline Service: Excellent
Airline Comments:


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Amount: $2254
Trophy Fees: $1,200 vaal rhebok, $1,100 blue duiker, $75 spotted genet cat. Amount: $2375
Permits/Licenses: Included. Amount: $0
Commercial Airfares: $4,900 round trip business class and $450 in country. Amount: $5350
Charter Airfares: $940 immigration and pass fee and 26 hours at $85 per hour. Amount: $3150
Other Costs: Travel observer $840; airport taxes $45; Harris House $200, gifts $50. Amount: $1135
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt:
Highlights of Hunt: See comments.
Equipment Recommendations: Cold weather gear that can be layered.
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? Yes
Why? See comments.


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Gilbert E. Orr
Contact Information: Tel. 408-683-4863 - PO Box 870, San Martin, CA 95046-0870
Hunting Experience: I have been on 21 trips to Africa, three trips to Australia, six trips to Canada and numerous North American hunts outside California. I have also hunted in New Zealand and New Guinea.
Physical Condition: Good.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL
(Editor note: This item belonges to a longer subscriber report that deals with three countries, Zambia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. If you would like to order these reports, please contact us and ask for items number 1712 and 1713.)

I first contacted Tim Rudman in 1997, on a recommendation from a friend of mine, Mr. Richard D'anglo. I wanted to hunt eleven (11), different species located in South Africa, Namibia, Zambia, and Zimbabwe. The Zimbabwe part of the original hunt was conducted in 1999 with Steve Schwarer at Bangala Safaris. This hunt report has been completed and filed with The Hunting Report. This hunt was to be taken in 1998, but due to medical problems I had to reschedule the event(s), with Steve Schwarer and Tim Rudman.

The 1999 Safari Club International (SCI), convention allowed Mr. Rudman and myself to put together this safari for yellowback duiker, black-faced impala, Damara dik-dik, puku, vaal rhebok, blue duiker, and the genet cat. These animals are located in the three (3), countries listed above, and we scheduled time in each country to hunt the indidgous animals. I also indicated that if time were available I would like to hunt a cheetah.

We departed for Windhock to clear passport control, and customs. We landed at the old airport just outside of town. I wish I had had some time to re-visit the town, and see old friends, but time was a factor. Refueled, paid a landing fee, cleared passport control, customs, and departed to Gaborone, Botswana. There we refueled, paid a landing fee, and departed to Pretoria, RSA, using an Instrument Flight Route (IFR), to get there. The flight was uneventful, and we landed at Pretoria. The RSA custom and passport individual was not present, and we were requested to return the following day. Tim's friend picked us up at the airport, and transported us to the Harris Place to stay until we departed to the Eastern Cape to do another safari for vaal rhebok, blue duiker, and a genet cat. I dropped off the hides, and horns, at Trans African Taxidermists/Rodney Kretzschmar on our way to the Eastern Cape the following morning, after clearing passports, and guns, we said our good-bye's to the pilot, Jan Marais. We stayed the night at Tim Rudman's ranch, and the following morning I departed with Mr. Ewald van Nieuwholtz to Molteno to hunt the vaal rhebok at C. J. Broster's ranch "Broughton". Mr. Van Nieuwholtz filled in for Tim Rudman on this hunt because of some health problems within the family. It was right and proper for Tim to stay with his family at a time like that situation. I would have done the same thing. That night we stayed at Justine Stratton's place (Coldstream Farm, Molteno, RSA). The sleeping and wash facilities were fabulous. I even had a bathtub to use, which I thoroughly enjoyed. Mrs. Barbara Stretton, a local schoolteacher, fixed breakfast and dinner, plus made lunch for us each day. The laundry service was also great.

The first morning of the hunt we traveled to John Broster' s ranch to acquaint ourselves with John, and find the layout of the boundaries. The ranch was hilly, with high plateau at the top. Climbing the hills, for an out of shape individual like myself, can be a problem in being in the right place at the right time. After getting the grand tour, we decided to return in the late afternoon, pick a stand, and maybe a vaal rhebok would wander past. It was a nice thought, but I have never had this type of luck. No glory. We returned to the Coldstream Farm to have a tremendous dinner, and to bed.

The next morning we arose early, had a fabulous breakfast, and headed back to Broster's ranch. We arrived just after daylight, and climbed to the top of the plateau. We stalked toward the vaal rhebok, when they took off running across the plateau, across the down slope, across the valley, and up to and on the plateau on the next ridge. The speed at which this was accomplished was just unbelievable, and very awesome to behold. Well, back to the vehicle for some water, lunch, and discussion. Afterwards, we drove to the next ridge with the plateau where the vaal rhebok appeared to have gone. Going up the road required 4 x 4 to climb to the top. Reaching the top, low and behold, there they were, inside 100 yards, and I was sitting inside the vehicle with my rifle in a gun rack in the back. The buck was very large, and well developed. They stuck around only long enough to decide that it was not healthy to remain there, and off they went to the plateau from wince they came. Or so we thought at the time. We traveled around this second plateau thinking that the vaal rhebok had doubled back on us to remain on this plateau. However, after noting the broken fences, the lay of the land, and various possible escape routes, we determined that we had been out foxed again by these Wiley rheboks. After this, we decided it was time for the use of knowledgeable people, so we returned to John Broster, with hat in hand, to ask for his assistance in this matter. John agreed to help this wayward soul collect a vaal rhebok. John gathered his crew, and we proceeded to the first plateau that was reachable through a valley separating the two plateaus. John's crew was dropped off at the base of the first plateau. We, in turn, climbed the hill, and proceeded to a high ridge point that contained a broken fence line. There we waited. We were sort of out of sight behind the rocks we used before. The drivers came up the hill in a regular fashion, and the small herd with the buck split apart, with two (2) heading across the valley to the other plateau, and three (3) heading off to our right. The three (3) head to our right went through the broken fence out into an area that contained a multitude of nicks and cranny's, trees, shrubs, short grass, and was somewhat difficult to traverse. We followed, thinking the buck was part of the three (3). We descended down the ridge, cut back behind the drivers out onto the cattle plain, and proceeded to follow the other two (2) head. The buck was not among these three (3). Outsmarted again. All of us retired from the hill in a very careful manner due to the terrain. John then took us to the caves on his property to view the paintings, and living quarters, for the "early ones". It was very interesting to view, and see for myself, the living conditions these people had to endure. I, my guide, and my tracker left for the Coldstream Farm to have a great dinner, good conversation, and then off to bed to try again the following day.

The third day of this hunt we returned to the valley between the two ridges with the great plateau on each one to see if we might have better luck. We climbed to the top of the ridge, and we spotted the vaal rhebok as soon as we crested. They had us spotted, and they took off for the other plateau. We decided to pick a spot, and the black tracker with the vehicle, and try to spook the beauties toward us for a possible shot. We picked a group of rocks near the back of the valley to lay in wait. The black tracker left to do his thing. We waited, and waited, until the tracker was spotted. The tracker indicated the rheboks came our way, but we denied it. We had an excellent view of the slope on the other side of the valley. Anyway, they were gone. There was no sign of them. We surmised that they escaped through one of the holes in the back fence, and traveled without anyone seeing them. This species of animal is not easy to hunt. As we were returning for lunch at the Coldstream Farm, we discussed other opportunities that might be available. The guide had names of other landowners that could be contacted. Also, Mr. Justin Stratton was due to return that night. He had access to his father-in-law's ranch, which was supposed to have many heads. So after lunch, we decided to visit a Mr. Rob Stretton at his ranch to obtain permission to hunt it. We found him at his workshop, and he gave his permission to hunt for vaal rhebok. We drove up the rolling hills as far as we dared, and proceeded on foot after that. When we finished, it was coming on to dark, but still light enough to see, and shoot by. Rob also informed us about another piece of property that belonged to him, but did not border the home ranch. Rob gave us directions on how to get there, and we were following them around a corner, when we made contact with a vaal rhebok that was next to the road. What a surprise. We could not hunt them because they were not on the proper land. The buck of the herd was a very, very good one. My estimate would have been its score in teen placing of the SCI record book. We continued on the road to the second location where we met Rob, and his wife. They were feeding their cattle at the time. We decided to hunt the second piece of property the next morning, if Justin Stratton did not return, and could not help us with our endeavor. When we arrived back at Coldstream Farm there was a strange truck parked in the yard, and we learned that Justin had indeed arrived. We had a long discussion before, during, and after dinner, about guns, and hunting, but the bottom line was that Justin agreed to help us hunt the vaal rhebok the next morning on his father-in-law's property.

Early the next cold morning, we drove to Justin's father-in-law's ranch. This ranch was on the way to John Broster's place. From the highway, it looked beautiful. Up close it was fabulous. We were informed where the vaal rheboks had been spotted the last couple of days, and we drove out onto the ranch to begin our hunt. I stepped out of the truck, at the stop point, and stepped into the Arctic Circle, or so I thought. It was very cold. Justin took off looking for tracks. He found some fresh ones, and we started climbing the hill. I had thought we were going to the top, but we started side hilling it at about three-quarters of the way to the top. The terrain on that mountain had a lot of thick and tall grass, which shadows the actual terrain over which a person must walk. It was slow going for a while. Justin, at that time, returns to the vehicle so that he could drive back through the ranch yard, and go to the front side of the mountain to make a drive. The guide, tracker, and I are alone to spot, and track, the animal. We spotted mountain reedbuck, but they spooked, and split for safer areas. We had also spotted vaal rhebok, but they are too far away to take a shot at, and besides, they had us spotted long ago. We continued the side hill to almost the end of the mountain, and hole up waiting for Justin to show up. He appeared shortly, and we discussed the situation. At about this time, we spot a small herd inside a brick enclosed area. That herd of vaal rhebok had a buck, and we decide to go for it. The guide and I head down the hill, trying to stay out of sight, as much as possible, because the buck is outside the brick enclosure, and low on a small hillside with a flat top. We make it down the hill, across the small valley, up the small hill, and were traveling to the wire fence, when Justin, and the tracker, start to yell. The buck had moved, and we were behind him. We retraced part of our tracks, and then made for the side of the hill where the buck was located. He had moved again, and was now standing broadside across the little valley from whence we departed. We set up the shooting sticks, put the crosshairs of the Sawarovski scope at the proper location on the animal, and fired. The range was approximately 100 yards. Somehow, I missed. I reloaded while the buck ran a short way and stopped. I fired a second time. There was a hit. It was low, and on the off shoulder. I could not see it, but Justin, and the tracker, could see it, and they started to yell. I fired a third round, and missed. At that point in time, the vaal rheboks ran into the trees for cover. I thought that the buck was with the does. An animal stepped out from the protection of the trees, and I have the crosshairs on the animal. The distance was around 200 yards. During that same time frame, the guide was looking in a direction 90 degrees from me. The buck did not move with the does, but rather along side the hill that Justin and the tracker were located on, and lower down. I had thought the guide was looking in my direction, and the guide must have thought that I was looking in his direction. The bottom line to this is that I shot, and paid trophy fees, for a doe vaal rhebok. The buck ran off some more with the third shot, so the guide, and Justin, using my rifle, went off after the buck. They shot it, and brought it back, along with the doe. The tracker retrieved the vehicle, and we proceeded to the ranch house to explain the situation. We then retired to the Coldstream Farm to skin the two vaal rhebok, and then we departed to Tim Rudman's ranch.

We spent the night at Tim's ranch, after receiving a wonderful supper. We also received a wonderful breakfast the next morning. I asked Maryna if she would like to go with me to the Arctic Circle to prepare the meals. I love her cooking. I always gain weight when I stay at her place. Tim and I stopped at Maryna's parent's home on the way to our next hunt, where I met some very wonderful people. I wish I had come to this area sooner. Departing, we continued on to my next hunt, the blue duiker. Our drive to the hunt area covered some ground that was very beautiful to behold. The building structures, and churches, were things of beauty, and showed the ways of construction, and the types of materials used to accomplish those beautiful tasks. Our destination was Kariega Park (Salem) (P.O. Box 35, Kenton-on-sea 1691, RSA). That place was beyond words. The quarters that you are assigned were a chalet located away from the check in point. The buildings were not on top of each other, and each had it's own privacy. Each building had car ports for the vehicles, three or four bedrooms with their own bathroom facilities, a full kitchen stocked with the necessary equipment, a very large family room with a TV, and a decking that allows you to view the local terrain, plus local animals. Driving into, and out of, the place allows you to view the local wild game herds that were resident on the property. In addition, there was a restaurant, and bar, located on the premises that served very excellent food and drink. I had coke, and lots of it.

The next day was a "free" day in that we could not hunt, so we decided to visit the area to see what was there. After breakfast, Tim took me to see a marina at Kenton-on-sea. This marina was well located to the ocean, and had berths for boats/ships. The housing on the marina was protected by an on-duty security guard. It looked like a nice place to live. From there, we traveled to the Albany Museum. It was a small museum, but had some very nice displays that I enjoyed. I did have to inform the Curator of the museum to switch the "oribi" and "blue duiker" heads, because of incorrect labeling in the display. This museum needs to expand due to its location, and prior historical events, but that takes non-existent money. After the museum, it was off to the Spur Restaurant for a meal of their famous ribs. It was very good ribs.

We departed Kariega Park early the next morning to the hunt area at Skietrug Farm (P.O. Box 386, Alexandria 6185, SA), that was run by Mr. Bev Long. In Zambia, Tim had wanted me to bag the blue duiker there, because it was easier. Boy, was he correct. Driving to the Skietrug Farm was mostly rolling hills, or so I thought. We picked up the dogs, handlers, Bev Long, Tim, the tracker, and myself, and headed out to hunt the blue duiker in South Africa. The dogs that were used in this hunt were very small, except for the bloodhound that was held close to followed animals. At first, it appeared that our trek was going to the center of the earth. I did not think the "mountain" that Bev's ranch facilities were located had a bottom. The roads consisted of dirt, and grass, where prior traffic had made paths in the hillside. What an awesome ride that was, it was gorgeous to behold. Those dirt roads had been cut out of the bush. The dogs, and handlers, were deposited at a specified point, with directions to proceed in a specified direction. Bev, Tim, and I would position ourselves at the point most likely to have the duikers depart. The weapon used for this hunt was a 12ga, double barrel shotgun with double triggers. The wind was blowing pretty strong, and the temperature was about normal for the area, and time of day. The duikers did want to cross the open lanes/roads between the bush areas. After several tries, with no duikers crossing the open areas, Tim and I were located off the open area in the bush, alongside the passing of several game trails. When the dogs, and handlers started again, three (3) duikers passed so close to us that I could have petted them, but was too close to swing the shotgun on them before they became obscured by the bush. This happened a lot faster than I am writing about it. After the fact, I started to laugh. Things happened quickly; I was looking in the wrong direction for number one, and Tim had no easy way to signal me that the duiker was coming right at us. I was too slow. The second duiker used the upper path, and is gone before I can swing on it, while the third one used the lower trail. Tim tried to get out of the way, but I can swing to the right fast enough to get a shot. This happened so quickly, and I was not able to react fast enough, that the only thing to do was laugh. I know why Tim wanted me to bag the blue duiker in Zambia. It would have been easier.

At this point in time, Bev Long decided upon another location that was on flat land, with less bush to prevent me from swinging the shotgun. This location was next to the riverbed, and we located the dogs and handlers at the proper position. We proceeded to our stand. On the way to the stand, Bev Long jumps a duiker from its bed under a bush. I could not get a shot at it due to people in the way. The drive began as directed. There was movement, but I could not get a shot. Then Tim and Bev spot one under a bush by a stump. I could only see its head and ears. It was looking to my left, in the direction of the dogs and handlers. I fired. There was some smoke that blurred my vision, and twigs were flying through the air, but the duikers head had disappeared. The second barrel was fired thinking the duiker was wounded and on the ground. We proceeded to the area on the other side, but no duiker. We did find blood. The bloodhound was called in to do his thing. The other dogs were still loose. The chase dogs were still stirring up other animals. The result was the bloodhound lost the trail, and could not relocate it. I just bought a blue duiker at $550.00 USD trophy fee. We might have been able to find the wounded duiker if the bloodhound had been allowed to proceed without the interference of the chase dogs.

The following morning, we returned to the area to check shot pattern, and look for possible dead body. No such luck. We try four (4) other drives, with three (3) producing no animals, and on the fourth drive the duiker was across the open area before I could swing on it. The fifth area this morning is set up, and I am looking up hill, thinking the duikers will cross there. Bev and Tim told me to look left, and there was one crossing. I swing on it like you do trap shooting smoothly and follow through. I bagged this one. It was a female with very good horns. We loaded up dogs, handlers, duiker, Bev, Tim, tracker, and myself to return to Bev's ranch facilities to skin the duiker, and have lunch. When the skinning was completed, we returned to Kariega Park after saying good bye. We consumed another excellent meal at the park.

The next morning we loaded up, said our good bye's at Kariega Park, and headed out to Blaauwkrantz Safari's (P.O. Box 583, Uitenhage 6230,RSA). I have hunted and stayed at Mr. Arthur and Trinette Rudman's facilities in the past, and I was looking forward to seeing them again. We arrived just in time for lunch, which was very good. After lunch we went into town to purchase film, two dolls for granddaughters, and a dictionary. After supper that evening we went hunting for a genet cat. I was using my 300 Win Mag, with 180gr solids done by A-Square. We left Rudman's at 2030 (8:30 PM), and returned to Rudman's at 2130 (9:30 PM). This was the shortest hunt I have ever been on in Africa. The A-Square solids did a beautiful job, thanks.

The following morning (08/26/99 -- Thursday), we said good bye to Arthur and Trinette. Tim and I headed off to Port Elizabeth with the tracker to do more shopping, clear the bill, and get me on an airplane for Johannesburg, where someone from Harris Place would pick me up, and on Friday morning put me back on an airplane for Zimbabwe.

This year's safari was supposed to complete the attaining of all the species of animals from the northern boundary of Zambia to Cape Town, South Africa. I have hunted all of the species, but am lacking three (3) to complete my goal. These three are the yellowback duiker, crocodile and civet cat.

There were mistakes, oversights, etc done that should not have been allowed. My Sawarovski riflescope was broken from the start, but the only way to detect the problem was to adjust the power to maximum and look through it. The top and left side mounting points for the cross hairs had broken. At maximum power these points are fully visible and the cross hairs wobble when the rifle moves. This problem cost me money that I should not have had to spend. Another point is the yellowback duiker requires more study to determine good location, quantity available, time needed to be reasonably assured of completing the hunt, and can toy horns be reasonably used to complete the task, or should the leaves of a certain plant be used to be successful.

Overall, I have to say this hunt was good, and I would recommend it to my friends.



«« Back to the Report ListGet Instant Access to Our Complete Database »»


Site Map
Home | Subscription Related | Articles & Reports | Trophies  | Advertising | E-mail Extra | Online Store

The Hunting Report Copyright © 2014Who We Are/What We Do / Privacy Policy / Contact Us


Hunting Newsletter
Hunting in Africa, Hunting in Canada, Hunting in Russia...it's all here!
Read an issue of The Hunting Report Newsletter online right now!
Get the latest issue of The Hunting Report Newsletter by mail.
Hunting Africa, hunting russia, hunting europe....It's all one click away!

Outfitter Reports
Hunting Outfitter Reports
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z


Hunting Reports & Articles
Hunting Experiences
From Fellow Hunters
Angola Hunting (1)
Argentina Hunting (113)
Armenia Hunting (3)
Australia Hunting (99)
Austria Hunting (7)
Azerbaijan Hunting (19)
Benin Hunting (16)
Botswana Hunting (99)
Bulgaria Hunting (2)
Burkina Faso Hunting (4)
Cameroon Hunting (106)
Central African Republic Hunting (54)
Chad Hunting (8)
Chile Hunting (3)
China Hunting (13)
Croatia Hunting (5)
Czech Republic Hunting (5)
Ecuador Hunting (1)
England Hunting (23)
Estonia Hunting (2)
Ethiopia Hunting (38)
France Hunting (1)
Germany Hunting (1)
Ghana Hunting (2)
Greece Hunting (2)
Greenland Hunting (4)
Hungary Hunting (9)
Iceland Hunting (2)
Italy Hunting (1)
Iran Hunting (2)
Kazakhstan Hunting (11)
Kyrgyzstan Hunting (20)
Liberia Hunting (6)
Macedonia Hunting (5)
Mexico Hunting (137)
Mongolia Hunting (67)
Mozambique Hunting (79)
Namibia Hunting (256)
Nepal Hunting (2)
New Caledonia Hunting (19)
New Zealand Hunting (217)
Pakistan Hunting (17)
Papua New Guinea Hunting (4)
Philippines Hunting (3)
Poland Hunting (5)
Romania Hunting (11)
Russia Hunting (80)
Scotland Hunting (28)
Serbia Hunting (1)
Slovakia Hunting (1)
Slovenia Hunting (3)
South Africa Hunting (718)
Spain Hunting (171)
Sudan Hunting (4)
Switzerland Hunting (4)
Tajikistan Hunting (37)
Tanzania Hunting (256)
Turkey Hunting (24)
Turkmenistan Hunting (10)
Uganda Hunting (10)
Ukraine Hunting (3)
Vietnam Hunting (1)
Yugoslavia Hunting (1)
Zambia Hunting (143)
Zimbabwe Hunting (537)


Hunting Reports & Articles
Hunting Experiences
From Fellow Hunters
Alberta Hunting (115)
Manitoba Hunting (22)
New Brunswick Hunting (4)
Newfoundland Hunting (32)
Nunavut Hunting (65)
Northwest Territories Hunting (195)
Ontario Hunting (11)
Quebec Hunting (47)
Saskatchewan Hunting (51)
Yukon Hunting (80)


Hunting Reports & Articles
Hunting Experiences
From Fellow Hunters
Alabama Hunting (5)
Alaska Hunting (475)
Arizona Hunting (41)
California Hunting (68)
Colorado Hunting (83)
Florida Hunting (25)
Georgia Hunting (3)
Hawaii Hunting (16)
Idaho Hunting (39)
Illinois Hunting (15)
Iowa Hunting (7)
Kansas Hunting (28)
Kentucky Hunting (5)
Louisiana Hunting (4)
Maine Hunting (13)
Maryland Hunting (1)
Michigan Hunting (27)
Minnesota Hunting (1)
Mississippi Hunting (3)
Missouri Hunting (8)
Montana Hunting (65)
Nebraska Hunting (7)
Nevada Hunting (33)
New Hampshire Hunting (2)
New Jersey Hunting (1)
New Mexico Hunting (92)
New York Hunting (8)
North Carolina Hunting (3)
North Dakota Hunting (3)
Ohio Hunting (2)
Oklahoma Hunting (1)
Oregon Hunting (18)
Pennsylvania Hunting (2)
South Carolina Hunting (7)
South Dakota Hunting (9)
Tennessee Hunting (1)
Texas Hunting (257)
Utah Hunting (31)
Vermont Hunting (3)
Washington Hunting (6)
Wisconsin Hunting (3)
Wyoming Hunting (143)
 
Hunting Reports & Articles
Hunting Experiences
From Fellow Hunters
Alligator Hunting (22)
Antelope Hunting (355)
   Blackbuck Antelope
   Klipspringer Antelope
   Pronghorn Antelope
Argali Hunting (77)
Banteng Hunting (32)
Bear Hunting (704)
   Black Bear
   Brown Bear
   Grizzly Bear
   Polar Bear
Bison Hunting (20)
Blesbok Hunting (315)
Bobcat Hunting (29)
Bongo Hunting (61)
Bontebok Hunting (38)
Buffalo Hunting (1004)
   Cape Buffalo
   Nile Buffalo
   Water Buffalo
Bushbuck Hunting (633)
   Chobe Bushbuck
   Harnessed Bushbuck
   Limpopo Bushbuck
   Masai Bushbuck
   Menelik Bushbuck
Bushpig Hunting (137)
Caracal Hunting (87)
Caribou Hunting (314)
   Central Canada Caribou
   Mountain Caribou
   Quebec-Labrador Caribou
Cat Hunting (86)
Chamois Hunting (203)
   Cantabrian Chamois
Cheetah Hunting (18)
Chevrotain Hunting (2)
Civet Hunting (33)
Coyote Hunting (19)
Crocodile Hunting (181)
Deer Hunting (1302)
   Brocket Deer
   Columbia Blacktail Deer
   Coues Whitetail Deer
   Desert Mule Deer
   Fallow Deer
   Hog Deer
   Mule Deer
   Pere David Deer
   Red Deer
   Roe Deer
   Rusa Deer
   Sambar Deer
   Sika Deer
   Sitka Blacktail Deer
   Water Deer
   Whitetail Deer
Dik-Dik Hunting (65)
Donkey Hunting (4)
Duiker Hunting (453)
   Blue Duiker
   Bush Duiker
   Common Duiker
   Red-Flanked Duiker
Eland Hunting (611)
   Cape Eland
   Giant Eland
Elephant Hunting (374)
Elk Hunting (285)
   Asian Elk
   Rocky Mountain Elk
   Roosevelt Elk
   Tule Elk
Gazelle Hunting (142)
   Goitered Gazelle
   Grant Gazelle
   Soemmerring Gazelle
   Thomson Gazelle
   Tibetan Gazelle
Gemsbok/Oryx Hunting (503)
Gerenuk Hunting (57)
Giraffe Hunting (94)
Goat Hunting (147)
   Feral Goat
   Mountain Goat
Grysbok Hunting (97)
Hartebeest Hunting (207)
   Red Hartebeest
Hippopotamus Hunting (212)
Hyena Hunting (162)
Ibex Hunting (263)
   Beceite Spanish Ibex
   Gredos Ibex
Impala Hunting (750)
Jaguar Hunting (2)
Javelina Hunting (39)
Kob Hunting (68)
Korrigum Hunting (6)
Kudu Hunting (1006)
   Greater Kudu
   Lesser Kudu
Lechwe Hunting (135)
   Red Lechwe
Leopard Hunting (541)
Lion Hunting (472)
   Mountain Lion
Lynx Hunting (34)
Markhor Hunting (9)
Moose Hunting (254)
   Mountain Moose
   Shiras Moose
Mouflon Hunting (104)
Muntjac Hunting (16)
Musk Ox Hunting (54)
Nilgai Hunting (16)
Nyala Hunting (303)
   Mountain Nyala
Oribi Hunting (106)
Ox Hunting (60)
Peccary Hunting (29)
Prarie Dog Hunting (5)
Puku Hunting (95)
Reedbuck Hunting (355)
   Mountain Reedbuck
Reindeer Hunting (6)
Rhebok Hunting (72)
Rhinoceros Hunting (84)
Roan Hunting (187)
Sable Hunting (369)
Sheep Hunting (669)
   Aoudad Sheep
   Barbary Sheep
   Bighorn Sheep
   Blue Sheep
   California Big Horn Sheep
   Corsican Sheep
   Dall Sheep
   Desert Bighorn Sheep
   Feral Sheep
   Four-Horned Sheep
   Kerman Sheep
   Mouflon Sheep
   Red Sheep
   Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep
   Soay Sheep
   Stone Sheep
Sitatunga Hunting (112)
Springbok Hunting (406)
Steenbok Hunting (220)
Suni Hunting (39)
Tahr Hunting (149)
   Himalayan Tahr
Takin Hunting (1)
Tiang Hunting (11)
Topi Hunting (38)
Tsessebe Hunting (94)
Tur Hunting (7)
Urial Hunting (18)
Varmint Hunting (71)
Warthog Hunting (696)
Waterbuck Hunting (471)
Wildebeest Hunting (665)
   Black Wildebeest
   Blue Wildebeest
Wolf Hunting (231)
Wolverine Hunting (45)
Yak Hunting (3)
Zebra Hunting (725)
   Burchell's Zebra