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Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Prophet Muskwa Outfitter Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 5378 Weapon Used: Muzzleloader How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: September 22, 2005 to October 7, 2005
Place of Hunt: Canada - Yukon
Hunt Area: Kusawa Lake


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Prophet Muskwa Outfitter. PO Box 6677; Fort Saint John; British Columbia; V1J 4J1; Canada; Tel. 250-789-9494; Email: info@prophetmuskwa.com; Web www.olmsteadhunting.com
Personal Guide (if any): Peter Jules
Booking Agent (if any):
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Sheep, Dall - Availability: Scarce - Trophy Size: None seen.
Moose - Availability: Scarce - Trophy Size: Yukon moose. Very small.
Bear, Grizzly - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Large.
Game Sought But Not Taken: Sheep, Dall - Availability: Could not find any rams.
Game Condition Comments: Did not see a ram. Moose - saw three bulls, largest was 54 inches. Saw lots of bear probably why no moose or sheep.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Fair Guide/PH Ability: Fair
Condition of Camp: Fair Condition of Equipment: Good
Quality of Food: Poor Trophy Care: Fair
Name of Airline: Air Canada Airline Service: Fair
Airline Comments: All luggage arrived in both directions.


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Amount: $10500
Trophy Fees: Amount: $11000
Permits/Licenses: Amount: $500
Commercial Airfares: Amount: $0
Charter Airfares: Amount: $1400
Other Costs: Accomodations. Amount: $500
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt: No rams. Spent 16 days in area and did not see one ram. Outfitter even flew in a second guide with 40 years expereince. We went to another hunting area/camp late and still did not see a ram. Also, turns out that a "big" moose in this area is 55 inches. And all moose are very scarce (we saw three bulls in 16 days. Mine was biggest at 54 inches.
Highlights of Hunt: Shot one moose at 340 yards, running full speed. Finishing shot was Texas Heart Shot at 309 yards. Both with TIC. 50 a Muzzleloader. Beautiful country. Saw nine grizzly four at less than 100 yards.
Equipment Recommendations: Cattle prod to get Indian guide out of camp.
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? N/A
Why? Yes for bear. No for sheep and moose. Moose are small in this area. Sheep success rate is not great. Main reason I would not hunt with Prophet again is because they are totally disorganized. Kevin Olmstead has acquired too many hunting areas and he is trying to manage them all from 1,000 miles to the south. Never knew what was going to happen from one day to the next.


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Leon J Munyan
Contact Information: Tel. 480-496-0701 - PO Box 51138, Phoenix, AZ 85076 E-mail: leon@munyan.com
Hunting Experience: Over 40 years in six continents.
Physical Condition: Good.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Prophet Muskwa Outfitter Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 4793 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: May 10, 2005 to May 18, 2005
Place of Hunt: Canada - British Columbia
Hunt Area: Queen Charlotte Island


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Prophet Muskwa Outfitter. PO Box 6677; Fort Saint John; British Columbia; V1J 4J1; Canada; Tel. 250-789-9494; Email: info@prophetmuskwa.com; Web www.olmsteadhunting.com
Personal Guide (if any): Marty Thomas
Booking Agent (if any):
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Bear, Black - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: Squared 7 feet 4 1/2 inches.
Game Sought But Not Taken:
Game Condition Comments: Where else can you take a 7 plus bear. Marty is one heck of a guide 1st rate outfit.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Excellent Guide/PH Ability: Excellent
Condition of Camp: Excellent Condition of Equipment: Excellent
Quality of Food: Excellent Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: Airline Service: N/A
Airline Comments:


COSTS
Hunting Fees: 1 on 1 Amount: $6000
Trophy Fees: 2 on 1 Amount: $4000
Permits/Licenses: Amount: $250
Commercial Airfares: Amount: $0
Charter Airfares: Amount: $0
Other Costs: Amount: $0
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt:
Highlights of Hunt: A big big bear.
Equipment Recommendations:
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? yes
Why?


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Tom Heller
Contact Information: Tel. 432-520-2080 - 5800 W. Hwy 80, Midland, TX 79706
Hunting Experience: Vast.
Physical Condition: Great.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Prophet Muskwa Outfitter Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 4572 Weapon Used: Bow How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: September 13, 2004 to September 27, 2004
Place of Hunt: Canada - British Columbia
Hunt Area: Muskwa River


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Prophet Muskwa Outfitter. PO Box 6677; Fort Saint John; British Columbia; V1J 4J1; Canada; Tel. 250-789-9494; Email: info@prophetmuskwa.com; Web www.olmsteadhunting.com
Personal Guide (if any): Garry Van Hee
Booking Agent (if any):
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Sheep, Stone - Availability: Average - Trophy Size: 11 year old. 33 X 15 inches.
Goat, Mountain - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: 8 inches.
Game Sought But Not Taken: Elk - Availability: Bowhunting - weather.
Game Condition Comments: Tremendous population of elk, good number of goats and sheep as well.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Excellent Guide/PH Ability: Excellent
Condition of Camp: Excellent Condition of Equipment: Excellent
Quality of Food: Excellent Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: Airline Service: Excellent
Airline Comments:


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Amount: $17500
Trophy Fees: Amount: $0
Permits/Licenses: Amount: $1000
Commercial Airfares: Amount: $459
Charter Airfares: Amount: $700
Other Costs: Amount: $0
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt: Record two-foot of snow on second day of hunt.
Highlights of Hunt: Awesome guide, beautiful country, successful seven-hour stalk on ram next to the last day of the hunt.
Equipment Recommendations: Comfortable boots and spotting scope.
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? Yes
Why? For the someone who is in good physical shape, chances are high to get a good ram due to the effort the guides are willing to put forth.


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Scott Wilson
Contact Information: Tel. 478-477-3966 - 3 River Trace E-mail: swjr@mindspring.com
Hunting Experience: Avid big game hunter. Have taken most North America species including two Dall stone previously worked for elk guide.
Physical Condition: Excellent.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL
This hunt was one of my most memorable and satisfying hunts for several reasons. First I was hunting with my good friend Tom Sainsbury from Idaho Falls, ID. Second I was fortunate to be hunting with guide Garry Van Hee from Toronto. Garry has over 18 years experience and has guided over 50 sucessful sheep hunts. Even though this was his first time hunting in this area and with this outfit, by the time I got to camp Garry was three for three on sheep. The pressure was on me. He had already spotted a tremendous ram right out of the main camp the day prior to my arrival. We gathered supplies and headed out to spike camp the next day. On the way to spike camp we spotted a 330 B&C bull elk and several cows bedded on hill side. I made an exciting stalk with my bow to within 60 yards and chose not to take a shot. The next day we hunted hard without seeing much. It started snowing and didn't stop for two days. We were virtually locked down for four days before heading back to main camp where we attempted to hunt from there for most of the rest of the hunt until the last few days. We had scoured the area where Garry felt the big ram would be, spotted four rams from camp and after a seven-hour stalk connected on a beautiful 11 year old ram. When we got back to main camp the next day, my buddy Tom and his guide were sitting there with the ram we had been chasing all week, a beautiful 40-inch stone that will probably be one of the top two taken in BC in 2004. In all I saw over 30 rams with three of those being legal, numerous legal billies and more elk than I could count. My guide Garry finished his season four of four in 2004 on stone sheep. Although others may have experienced low numbers of stone sheep we had our fair share, but seeing them is the easy part, getting to them is where the work is. The guides Tom and I had were exceptional in physical ability and had a trememdous willingness to do what it took to get the animal. I highly recommend this outfitter.

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Prophet Muskwa Outfitter Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 5793 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: August 29, 2004 to September 13, 2004
Place of Hunt: Canada - British Columbia
Hunt Area: Prophet Drainage - Richards Creek Camp


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Prophet Muskwa Outfitter. PO Box 6677; Fort Saint John; British Columbia; V1J 4J1; Canada; Tel. 250-789-9494; Email: info@prophetmuskwa.com; Web www.olmsteadhunting.com
Personal Guide (if any): Kevin Napoleon
Booking Agent (if any): Safari Headlands. Ronda de Toledo, 38; 28005; Madrid; Spain; Tel. 011-34-91-468-6622; Email: headlands@audinex.es; Web www.safariheadlands.com
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Elk, Rocky Mountain - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: 343 B&C.
Moose - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: 51 inches.
Game Sought But Not Taken: Sheep, Stone - Availability: Guide was a first timer in the area.
Goat, Mountain - Availability:
Game Condition Comments: Elk and moose are abundant. Stone sheep are very scarce.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Excellent Guide/PH Ability: Good
Condition of Camp: Excellent Condition of Equipment: Excellent
Quality of Food: Excellent Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: Air Canada Airline Service: Excellent
Airline Comments: I had no problems at all with weapons.


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Amount: $21735
Trophy Fees: Amount: $6210
Permits/Licenses: Amount: $1577
Commercial Airfares: Amount: $1200
Charter Airfares: Amount: $700
Other Costs: Dip and pack $400 and tips $500 Amount: $900
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt: It was the first time that my guide was in the area so, even his very good skills for guiding, we couldn't get a sheep.
Highlights of Hunt: Wonderful environment. Lots of moose and elk.
Equipment Recommendations: Be prepared for both, heat and cold. Weather in the mountains changes fast.
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? Yes
Why? Nevertheless my main target (and main payment) was stone sheep, so for me this hunt was unsuccessful, even though I took other two good trophies.


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Jose Marti
Contact Information: Tel. 011-34-917-451414 - Paseo Habana 12, Madrid, Spain 28036 E-mail: jmarti@unilco.es
Hunting Experience:
Physical Condition: Fine.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL
My guide, Kevin, was the brother of Art Napolean, a legend in stone sheep hunting. Unfortunately he broke an ankle and couldn't hunt with me. He made the effort (which I deeply thanked) of coming two days with us, of course he couldn't climb but he showed us the way and those were the only two days we saw sheep. After that he had elk and moose hunters and couldn't come with us anymore. Futhermore we had bad weather that didn't allow us to hunt in the mountain some days. Maybe had the weather been good we would have harvested the sheep. But what I am sure is that if Kevin should known the area even with bad weather we would have hunted the sheep without doubt, because he has a lot of experience in guiding and is a very good companion.

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Prophet Muskwa Outfitter Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 4555 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: August 14, 2004 to August 30, 2004
Place of Hunt: Canada - British Columbia
Hunt Area:


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Prophet Muskwa Outfitter. PO Box 6677; Fort Saint John; British Columbia; V1J 4J1; Canada; Tel. 250-789-9494; Email: info@prophetmuskwa.com; Web www.olmsteadhunting.com
Personal Guide (if any):
Booking Agent (if any):
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken: Sheep, Stone - Availability: Average - Trophy Size: 36 inches.
Goat, Mountain - Availability: Abundant - Trophy Size: 9 inches.
Game Sought But Not Taken:
Game Condition Comments: I saw 14 rams of which three were legal on first day. I shot 10 1/2 year old 36 inch stone on day one. Flew to another camp and shot goat. Kevin's first group of sheep hunters were 5 out of 5. I was second group 4 out of 5. Third group had bad weather and were 0 our of 5. I didn't know any hunter in group four or five so I don't know their success.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Good Guide/PH Ability: Excellent
Condition of Camp: Good Condition of Equipment: Good
Quality of Food: Good Trophy Care: Excellent
Name of Airline: Airline Service: Good
Airline Comments:


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Amount: $21000
Trophy Fees: Sheep no trophy fee, goat $3,150. Amount: $3150
Permits/Licenses: Amount: $0
Commercial Airfares: Amount: $0
Charter Airfares: $700 charter to camp, $500 charter to goat camp and $145 to pick me up from goat camp. Amount: $1345
Other Costs: Amount: $0
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt: Not enough experienced pilots to get everyone to destinations without wasting hunt days.
Highlights of Hunt: Seeing over 20 goats for two days in a row.
Equipment Recommendations:
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? Yes
Why?


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Aaron Kik
Contact Information: Tel. 616-457-6318 - 7646 20th Ave., Jenison, MI 49428 E-mail: drdx7646@aol.com
Hunting Experience: North America 29.
Physical Condition: Good.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Prophet Muskwa Outfitter Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 3940 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: September 14, 2003 to September 27, 2003
Place of Hunt: Canada - British Columbia
Hunt Area: Muskwa River


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Prophet Muskwa Outfitter. PO Box 6677; Fort Saint John; British Columbia; V1J 4J1; Canada; Tel. 250-789-9494; Email: info@prophetmuskwa.com; Web www.olmsteadhunting.com
Personal Guide (if any): Mike Papp
Booking Agent (if any): World Class Safaris. 386 Live Oak Dr.; Vero Beach; FL.; 32963; Email: info@worldclass-safaris.com; Web www.worldclass-safaris.com
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken:
Game Sought But Not Taken: Sheep, Stone - Availability: No mature (legal) rams seen.
Game Condition Comments: No mature rams had been seen by the two guides or hunters in this camp (six hunters and two guides) from August thru September.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Good Guide/PH Ability: Excellent
Condition of Camp: Good Condition of Equipment: Good
Quality of Food: Good Trophy Care:
Name of Airline: American. Airline Service: Good
Airline Comments:


COSTS
Hunting Fees: $12,500 + $437.50 GST Total Amount: $12935
Trophy Fees: Amount: $0
Permits/Licenses: Approximately Amount: $880
Commercial Airfares: Amount: $1100
Charter Airfares: Amount: $650
Other Costs: Amount: $0
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt: 14 days without seeing a legal ram.
Highlights of Hunt: Pack train charged by grizzly and an excellent guide.
Equipment Recommendations:
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? No
Why? Lack of legal rams.


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Terry Phillips
Contact Information: Tel. 830-990-9156 - 601 Lupine Ln., Fredericksburg, TX. E-mail: trphillipsnet@hotmail.com
Hunting Experience: Extensive
Physical Condition: Good.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent?
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought?


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL

Subscriber-Written Trip Report On Prophet Muskwa Outfitter Hunts

Below is one sample of such a Report which is made available to you FREE of Charge.

DATE AND PLACE OF HUNT
Report ID: 2271 Weapon Used: Rifle How Hunt Was Conducted? Guided
Date of Hunt: September 11, 2000 to September 22, 2000
Place of Hunt: Canada - British Columbia
Hunt Area:


OUTFITTER, GUIDE AND BOOKING AGENT DETAILS
Outfitter (or safari company): Prophet Muskwa Outfitter. PO Box 6677; Fort Saint John; British Columbia; V1J 4J1; Canada; Tel. 250-789-9494; Email: info@prophetmuskwa.com; Web www.olmsteadhunting.com
Personal Guide (if any): "Dan"
Booking Agent (if any): Keith Atcheson; Jack Atcheson & Sons, Inc.. 3210 Ottawa St; Butte; MT; 59701; Tel. 406-782-2382; Fax: 406-723-3318;Email: office@atcheson.com; Web www.atcheson.com
Trip Arrangements
(if self-guided):
License Required:


GAME DESCRIPTION
Major Game Animals Taken:
Game Sought But Not Taken: Goat, Mountain - Availability: Very few animals, and inexperienced guide.
Game Condition Comments: Very poor.


SERVICE RATINGS (excellent, good, fair or poor)
Quality of Outfit: Poor Guide/PH Ability: Poor
Condition of Camp: Poor Condition of Equipment: Good
Quality of Food: Fair Trophy Care:
Name of Airline: CaribouAir Airline Service: Fair
Airline Comments: Commercial airline was late; missed connection and camp flight. We were charged a second fare because of this.


COSTS
Hunting Fees: Amount: $7500
Trophy Fees: Amount: $0
Permits/Licenses: Amount: $397
Commercial Airfares: Amount: $930
Charter Airfares: Amount: $600
Other Costs: Amount: $0
Total: $0


SUMMARY REMARKS
Problems of Hunt: See attached letter. A rip off of US hunters ($80) on exchange for license fees, guide, no game, poor facilities.
Highlights of Hunt: None.
Equipment Recommendations:
Would You Recommend This Hunt to a Friend? No
Why? Very poorly done. Guide had no real interest in hunting!


HUNTER INFORMATION
Hunter Name: Timothy A. Patrick
Contact Information: Tel. 814-472-5857 - 419 West Horner St, Edenbury, PA 15931
Hunting Experience: Many guided hunts.
Physical Condition: Fairly good.


IMPORTANT NOTES (actions taken if hunter unhappy with hunt)
Notified Outfitter? Yes Notified Personal Guide? Notified Booking Agent? Yes
Seeking any kind of restitution or other settlement from agent, outfitter or guide?
If Seeking Restitution, What is Sought? I wrote to the outfitter and have had no reply. Please use the attached letter as you see fit, and protect the hunters.


ADDITIONAL HUNTER COMMENTS AND/OR OUTFITTER/BOOKING AGENT REBUTTAL
To: Jack Atcheson & Sons, Inc. From: Dr. Timothy A. Patrick Re: Hunting Trip With Prophet Muskwa Outfitters Date: October 23, 2000

I am in receipt of your letter and questionnaire regarding my recent hunt with Kevin Olmstead. Rather than fill out the questionnaire, I thought I enclose a letter, that my brother and I recently sent to Kevin Olmstead. It will give you a much better understanding of the hunt and the outfitter. While the letter clearly speaks for itself, I believe that I should add some additional points.

My brother Stuart and I have been on a great number of hunts over the years, throughout the U.S., and Canada, so we have a fair amount of knowledge and first-hand experience in observing how different outfitters discharge their obligations to their hunters. Most are very good because they truly love hunting, they thoroughly enjoy what they are doing and they take sincere pleasure in the success of their hunters.

If I had to make a realistic guess, I believe that on a least 50 percent of the hunts we have been on, one, or the other, or both of us, have failed to harvest an animal. While this is always terribly disappointing, that is what hunting is all about. It wouldn't be nearly as demanding or as much fun if we always scored; therefore our complaints about our experience with Kevin Olmstead have absolutely nothing to do with not harvesting a billy; it has to do with an outfitter who clearly does not demonstrate a love for hunting and appears to be in the business solely to make as much money as he can (i.e. consider the tag fee currency "rip-off," feeding hunters game meat which may or may not have been properly butchered and preserved just to save money on provisions, inadequately providing food for his camp, showing preference for repeat hunters over new ones, etc.).

I should also like to add a final anecdote to give you a further idea of what we were up against with Mr. Olmstead. Stuart and I had made plane reservations that were supposed to get us into Fort St. John at 2:00 p.m. on September 11th. Unfortunately, both of our flights to Vancouver were delayed by approximately two hours. We therefore never made our connection to Fort St. John. However, Stuart was able to have his office contact Kevin's son well before 8:00 a.m., and alert him that he would not be arriving in Fort St. John as planned. As a result, we did not fly out to Kevin's ranch until the morning of the 12th. We were at the ranch for about five or six hours, and during that time we had several short conversations with Kevin. At no time did he ever mention to us anything about missing the flight out to the ranch on the 11th. However, when we returned to the ranch on the 21st and he asked us questions about the hunt, he became progressively more agitated and discourteous with each response. Very abruptly he halted the conversation and told us that he was going to charge us another $600.00 for missing the flight to his ranch on the 11th. We believe that this was just another "rip-off" as we strongly suspect that our unused space on the September 11th flight was fully taken up with camp supplies, so that Prophet Muskwa benefited from our not being on the flight. The reason we suspect the foregoing is that when we flew out on the 12th, the plane was totally loaded with food and other camp supplies. Moreover, when we flew out of Kevin's ranch on the 21st, Wayne was supposed to fly back to Fort St. John with us, but had decided to hunt for several more days. His space was completely filled with material being sent back to town. This totally petty action certainly lends a new meaning to the phrase, "adding insult to injury" and was obviously taken largely out of pique.

In conclusion, we believe that Kevin Olmstead is not an outfitter who is going to reflect credit on your company. In our opinion, he is only in the business for the money, and couldn't care less if his hunters have a good experience or a bad one. It's all the same to him.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- NEW DOCUMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------

To: Mr. Kevin Olmstead of Prophet Muskwa Outfitters From: Stuart Patrick Re: Hunting Trip With Prophet Muskwa Outfitters

When we returned to your ranch on September 21st Tim and I were absolutely astounded, both by your discourtesy, as well as by your summary "brush-off" of all of our comments about our "goat hunt," even though we were attempting to respond to the questions that you were asking us. We have therefore decided to communicate our thoughts to you in this letter.

The Hunt Itself

You assured both Tim and me on at least two separate occasions over the telephone, that the White Water area had a great abundance of large billies and that we should have no problem in harvesting one if we were willing to climb after them.

During the nine days that we were at your White Water camp, we saw only three billies, two of which we saw when we were at our two-day spike camp. Your own guides reported this scarcity of billy sightings to you on numerous occasions via satellite telephone. One of these three bilies was totally inaccessible; Tim stalked the second for four hours before being spotted by the billy and the third we sow on two different occasions behind the White Water Camp. After the first sighting of this last billy, my guide and I climbed up into a high saddle looking for him, but he was not there. The second sighting came just hours before we left the White Water Camp. This situation was not improved any by your sitting at your ranch 40 plus miles away, personally possessing absolutely no knowledge of the area, (i.e. your guides told us that you had only visited the area once and had spent all of ten minutes on the White Water camp air strip) or the existing conditions there, and repeatedly telling our guides that we should just keep riding up and down the valley because there were "lots of billies in the area."

According to your guides, only two billies were harvested in the White Water area in 1999, and ten hunters harvested only five goats, both male and female, in 2000. Your guides suggested that the lack of billies might have been due to the lateness of our hunt (i.e. this was the latest goat hunt that you have ever scheduled in this area) and that the billies may have left the area due to the extremely harsh conditions that prevail in this valley during the winter.

Neither you, nor your guides, made even the slightest effort to do anything to improve our chances for success. After the initial two-day spike camp at the pass, neither you nor your guides suggested moving to another area or camp, setting up additional spike camps or backpacking into more promising areas such as Cat's Creek, etc.

Our chances for success were further diminished by your very obvious discrimination against us. When we went into the White Water camp, we were accompanied by a third hunter (i.e. Wayne) who had hunted with your outfit on at least two previous occasions. Wayne had tags for goat, moose and elk, whereas we only had goat tags. Wayne told us that he had requested Pat as his guide but you assigned him Jamie instead. Jamie was by far your best goat guide; having taken four of the five goats harvested this year at White Water. On the morning of the fourth day Jamie and Wayne left White Water for another camp seven and a half hours away. That left us with one very inexperienced guide, who until one month earlier had been a wrangler, and Pat who was somewhat more experienced. Additionally we were forced to abandon our spike camp after only two days solely to allow our guides to get back to White Water to allow Jamie and Wayne to leave for the other camp (i.e. because of the horses). There is absolutely no doubt that Wayne's hunt was given absolute preference over ours because of the amount of business he had done with your outfit over the years. As a result, you never made a good faith effort to deliver the goat hunt that we had every reason and right to expect.

You spoke with Tim on the satellite phone Tuesday evening, September 19th, and Tim informed you of our desire to terminate the hunt, due to the complete lack of any billies and your obvious lack of any concern for our situation as exemplified by your refusal to do anything more for us than to tell your guides to keep riding up and down the valley. During that conversation you told Tim, "o.k. I'll get you out of there tomorrow." When our guides called you the next morning at 8:00 a.m. to verify such arrangements, you told them that you had fog at the ranch and for us to sit tight and call back after 12:00 noon. When they called you after 12:00 noon, you told them that we would not be going out that day. Had you have told us candidly that there was virtually no chance that we would get out that day, we would have gone out hunting, rather than just sit around camp all day. Because you sent in another hunter on Thursday, when we were taken out, it is obvious that you never had any intention of making a special trip on the 20th to take us out as you promised on the 19th.

Equipment and Food

The cabin at White Water had a wood stove that your guides, other than Jamie, were unable to get lit. To make matters worse, because the stove did not have a damper, even when we did get it lit on two occasions, most of the heat went up the chimney and the fire died out completely in about forty-five minutes unless constantly tended. Thus, we almost never had any warmth in the cabin despite temperatures constantly in the low 30s F. Additionally, we were unable to dry out our clothing despite the tremendous amount of rain that we encountered. This was due not only to the faulty installation of the stove, but also to the fact that the cabin had a bare metal roof which dripped water all over our clothes and bedding as a result of condensation when f he stove was lit.

The single lantern supplied with the cabin was inoperative, so we only had our flashlights for lighting.

You failed to provide adequate meat for the camp. For the last two or three days there was no meat for dinner and for the last four days there was no lunchmeat. For $7,500, I believe we should have been better provisioned.

On three occasions, your guides served us elk and moose meat that had not been harvested by anyone in our group or camp. After eating the elk meat in spike camp, I developed very loose bowels, and that situation never changed for the remainder of the time I was on the hunt. In fact, I am still taking medication for this problem. Your cook, Ann, refused to cook any of the game meat that she had left the last few days because she thought it looked and smelled pretty rank. I do not believe that in the interest of your hunters' health that you should unilaterally subject them to the possibility of food poisoning and or parasite problems just to save yourself a few dollars!

Discriminatory Business Practices

We are particularly disturbed by the way you "rip-off" your U.S. hunters versus your Canadian hunters. As it appears that you are very well aware that the Canadian banks have ceased all retail banking in the U.S. and discourage U.S. accounts in Canada, you know that most U.S. citizens have no access to Canadian currency. As a result, you offer U.S. hunters only a fifteen percent discount on U.S. funds for the purchase of game fags, despite the fact that the actual discount is thirty-two to thirty-four percent. Based on the seventeen to nineteen percent differential, on each $500.00 of tag fees, you personally pocket $85.00 to $95.00 Canadian. How can you possibly justify this predatory practice? Clearly this is a deliberate and unfair strategy to unjustly enrich yourself at the expense of some of your hunters.

See Section 5 under the heading, The Hunt Itself.

In conclusion, Tim and I both spent over $9,500.00 to hunt goats with you. We believe that you grossly misrepresented the abundance and size (none of the billies we saw were larger than eight inches) of the billies in the White Water area. Knowing that we were not seeing any billies you did not make even the slightest effort to attempt to improve our situation, or to give your guides any guidance or suggestions whatsoever. For these reasons and all of the other reasons cited above, you did not give us any real value for the money we paid you for our hunt. The antagonism and discourtesy that you displayed toward us when we returned to your ranch made it absolutely clear that you could not have cared less whether we had a good hunt or not. You had gotten your money and that is all you cared about!

---------------------------------------------------------------------- NEW DOCUMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------

To: Dale Drown, General Manager of Guide Outfitters Association From: Timothy A. Patrick Re: Hunting Trip With Prophet Muskwa Outfitters Date: January 17, 2001

By way of introduction, I am enclosing a copy of two letters that we wrote regarding a mountain goat hunt that we had with Profit Muskwa Outfitters. One letter is to Kevin Olmstead which I might add has never been replied to, and the second letter is to Atchesons who arranged the goat hunt for us. These letters would appear to be self-explanatory.

In addition to the issues raised in the above-mentioned letters, both my brother and I have a serious question as to whether the guides that Kevin Olmstead used for this hunt were, in fact, licensed. We found that the names the guides used in camp were not the same names as those used on Kevin's Outfitter forms. One of the guides also stated that he had been a wrangler up until about a month before we arrived in camp. We had serious doubts as to whether or not he was licensed. This guide also had no experience guiding for goats. The second guide described his goat experience as being about five to six months in duration and stated that he had only taken one goat in the preceding year or two. It was apparent that Kevin Olmstead was bringing clients into the camp and supplying them with inexperienced guides. It was also apparent while in camp that neither guide had any idea what was in the first aid kit, no idea of what to do with the material once we explored the first aid kit, no idea of any concept of resuscitation should a client have any difficulty.

In addition to the letters enclosed, it would seem that any client going to Profit Muskwa would be at many different risks.

Finally, I would like to know if licensed guides have to carry photo I.D.'s? If so, how would one get a copy of those I.D.'s and who would we write to, to investigate this further?

We have been on many hunts, but this far and away was one of the worst experiences that both my brother and I had to endure.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- NEW DOCUMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------

To: The Hunting Report From: Keith Atcheson of Atcheson and Sons, Inc. Re: Hunting Trip With Prophet Muskwa Outfitters Date: April 26, 2001

Thanks for your letter of March 19th. We appreciate the opportunity to respond.

Dr. Timothy Patrick and his brother Stuart Patrick contacted our office last year in June. Dr. Patrick described to me that he and his brother were interested in hunting mountain goats later that fall, 2001. He mentioned that both he and his brother were in good physical condition and ages in the mid 60's. As you are aware, mountain goat hunting is extremely strenuous and therefore it was my recommendation they consider going on a boat hunt in southeast Alaska where hunting conditions potentially can be easier and the chances for success are high.

Unfortunately, the outfitters I had planned to send them with were already booked because of the time of year the Patrick's contacted our office. I recommended that they book a boat hunt for the following year in the fall of 2001 but they were insistent on booking a mountain goat hunt for last fall.

We provided the Patrick's with two or three options of horseback hunting in northern British Columbia as well as telephone numbers to contact these outfitters to discuss it in more detail. Knowing what the Patrick's ages were, I felt it to be very important that they discuss this directly with the outfitter to develop a feel for the level of difficulty and if they did decide to go, develop a hunting strategy. In fact, we encourage all of our clients to "talk with your outfitter."

Obviously the Patrick's are unhappy with the outcome of their trip. I have looked into this with the outfitter, Kevin Olmstead. Unfortunately as of this writing, I have not received any written response or hunt details from Mr. Olmstead. I can tell you that Mr. Olmstead's oral version of what occurred on this trip and the Patrick's' version are completely different. I don't believe it is my position, nor would it be fair to Mr. Olmstead or the Patrick's to convey the complete details of those phone conversations between Mr. Olmstead and me without Mr. Olmstead going into written detail and providing the affected parties with copies.

Briefly, I can tell you that from my understanding, one of the Patrick's did shoot at, and miss a large billy goat, and the other brother did see a goat that could have been stalked but apparently they did not attempt it due to the guide's judgment of where the goat was. Weather was also a factor. Olmstead also mentioned that his success on goats in 2000 was six for eight.

Our company has already offered a "Good Will Credit" of over $2,000 each to Timothy and Stuart Patrick, which they have accepted. When hunting trips go awry, it has always been our company policy to try and help our customers try to recover some of the money that was spent by giving them discounts on future trips. There is no other company in the business that does this. I might add that our company is not obligated to give credit to customers who had opportunities to kill game on fair chase hunting trips.

Please let me know if you need any further information. I look forward to hearing from you.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- NEW DOCUMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------

To: Dale Drown of G.O.A.B.C. From: Kevin Olmstead Re: Timothy A. Patrick, Stuart K. Patrick Client Complaint Date: May 10, 2001

Thank you for your letter dated April 19, 2001 regarding the above clients. As you will see, there are two letters attached from two of the employees involved in the complaint, and their assessment of the Patrick's hunt. The third employee is not in our employment at this time but can be interviewed if necessary.

My response to the matter is as follows:

The Patrick's were booked by Atcheson's booking service on July 6,2000. I received a phone call from Atcheson's in regard to their physical capabilities and if we could accommodate them. It was explained that they were in their 60's and not able to consistently climb high mountains. I explained that we could take them to the White Water Camp, which was one of our higher populations of goats. I also explained that we could hunt them from the valley on horseback and then use our spot and stalk strategy. I also explained that it was still goat hunting and they would have to make the effort to climb because of course the goats are not ever down low. I also told them that the camp was considered a tent camp and described the facilities. The hunt was booked and confirmed by a deposit that was forwarded to us shortly after. Contracts were sent and returned signed to us by both clients on August 9, 2000. Their booked dates for the hunt September 11 to September 22, 2000. Our policy is that the clients arrive into Fort St. John the day before they are to fly into camp. This date should have been September 10th, and then they would fly to camp on the 11th, and then start hunting on the 12th. Because of a conflict they were to arrive on the 11th at 2:00 p.m. and I agreed to hold the charter flight that usually departs at 9:00 a.m. so that they could still make it on our scheduled charter. This meant that all of our other clients had to wait as well. We try and keep the charters to a minimum because of the cost. They ended up missing their flights from Vancouver to Fort St. John and the charter departed without them on the 11th. This meant that the Patrick's had to have a non-scheduled flight charter to come into the area. This resulted in a charge of approximately $900.00, which is the charge that North Caribou Air charges. This has nothing to do with our rates or fees. When we book the planes we try and spread the costs among all of the clients. See exhibit A, part 5. This is a copy of our final letter that goes out to all clients to explain our policies and fee schedules for air charters. When they arrived they seemed to be in good spirits and the paper work was completed, and they were sent on their way to the White Water Camp. There was no money collected at this time for the balances due. It was decided that the funds would be collected at the end of the hunt.

License and Tags: One of the complaints that were mentioned in their letter was in reference to our exchange rate on the license and tag fees. See exhibit B, page 1, which is a copy of the form that is sent out explaining their choices for paying for these items. You will see that they can send Canadian funds or use our exchange rate of .85. This rate was established as a medium because of our fluctuating dollar. At no time do we ever intend to make money on this and the choice is the clients. As you can see the funds were sent in Canadian dollars from Stuart but Tim sent US. Exhibit B, page 2. Again, his choice.

Licensing and Guides: See exhibit C. It states that they were concerned that our guides were actually licensed and you will see their assistant guides licenses here. The guides all have nicknames and that is what they go by around camp.

First Aid Kit: All employees are issued a new first aid kit at the beginning of the season and procedures are discussed. After the Patrick's arrived in camp the guides were checking their kits and since Tim Patrick is a physician he was going through the kit with them. The guides were commenting on how nice the kits were and Tim started telling them all the things you could do with some of the supplies in the kit. From a doctors standpoint they may not have had enough medical experience but they were versed on standard medical procedures if there was to be an emergency.

Charter Flights: Because of our remote locations all planes are always full both coming in and going out if possible. This has nothing to do with anything except operating necessities. They are also mistaken on the charter dates for our other client named Wayne. He was never to fly with them, as he was in a different camp when they decided to leave. The reason they were not picked up on the 20th as scheduled, was because of the weather. I do not hold planes to the discomfort of one client to make another happy. The camps in my area are anywhere from 40 to 50 miles from the main lodge and many different types of weather can be happening. The ranch was fogged in as was town and the planes could not fly in. Safety is our first concern.

Equipment and Food: As stated in the first paragraph of this letter, Whitewater was originally a tent camp. During our upgrading we made available materials to build a new log cabin. This is where the clients slept. Because of the newness of the logs there was condensation in the cabin on the tin roof. We were notified of the problem and gave suggestions as to how to rectify the situation. The Patrick's did not show any anger towards the staff at the time. Their clothing did get damp and they dried them in the cookhouse. See Dan Fremlin's letter regarding stove. The meat that we serve is always fresh and sent to the camps frozen. When the frozen provisions runs out, the camps use canned supplies. The game meat that they ate had been harvested prior to their arrival, sent to Fort St. John to be professionally processed, frozen and then returned to the base camp for distribution. All camps get fresh produce, frozen meats such as poultry, pork chops, lunchmeat, and game meat on every client change. The cooks are trained well as to how to utilize it in the proper manner. Never do any of our clients go without properly prepared and handled food. See Ann Weibe's letter regarding food situation. Since the beginning in the outfitting business in 1987 and taking care of up to 170 clients in one calendar year, we have never had a report of food poisoning or parasite problems. We also spare no expense to provide clients with the best possible provisions and never have complaints about our food.

Assigning Guides: In the complaint Mr. Patrick talks about discrimination. There is never any discrimination on assigning guides. We try and match hunters with guides for physical ability, and desire of species. The client Wayne that he speaks of was younger, more experienced hunter, and willing to ride and climb anything and everything, therefore able to travel much further distances to other camp locations for his hunt. Jamie was familiar with other camps and therefore matched with Wayne. Wayne also had other species tags that he had applied for, and the Patrick's only chose to purchase a goat tag. See copies of their request forms. As far as Mr. Fremlin being a wrangler for the first part of the season, this is true. We always have a new guide wrangle for a few months in the area in which he will be hunting. This is to confirm that he knows the terrain, where the horses travel and where the game is located. We felt that he had proven to be knowledgeable and therefore moved him into a guide position. The reason Mr. Fremlin did not change locations or move to another camp, is because we were told at the booking that they did not want to climb continuously. Therefore backpacking, as is stated was out of the question. At one point Mr. Fremlin did suggest that they set up camp and go after some goats that were seen when in the Ipec Lake area and was told: "there was no way in hell..." See Mr. Fremlin's letter. So when he stated that we made no attempt to improve the chances for success we feel that this is not true. The staff did everything possible to make suggestions on how to achieve success.

Satellite Conversation: In item 6 of the letter a telephone conversation was mentioned. This conversation took place when our staff had called over to give us the nightly report they are required to make. During the conversation with the staff on September 19th, Tim grabbed the phone and started to verbally abuse the area, the staff; the game populations, the food, and the accommodations. He said that he wanted out of the area and wanted to leave. The staff told us that it was a very abrupt and surprising move on his part. They had all been sitting around the table having a great time. They stated to us that they were completely appalled and amazed at his actions. He had never voiced any disappointment or problems to any of them. When the conversation was over, the staff asked him why he had done that, and his brother had tried to stop him while in the middle of the conversation. Mr. Fremlin told me that he would call me back. When he got off the phone Mr. Patrick said: "you are going to make a liar out of me when you call him back aren't you?" Mr. Fremlin replied: "no I am going to tell him the truth". Mr. Patrick then went to his cabin. The staff then discussed what had taken place with astonishment. See letters from Dan Fremlin and Anne Weibe. The staff called me back the next morning and I told them to take care of the problems that he had addressed. They assured me that they had been all along. They also told me of the conversation and the statement of "making him a liar" and I was very upset. I tried to arrange for a flight to pick him up but was told there was fog in town. It was also foggy at the ranch where I was and I relayed the message to the Whitewater. I told them to check back with me at noon, which is traditional procedure, to see if the plane would be able to take off. Again we cover so much area that it can be very different weather wise in each of our camps. The weather continued to be fogged in and therefore could not fly until the following morning. Again safety is our number one concern.

When they finally arrived back to the ranch I have had several conversations with my staff, and the stories kept getting worse about him lying. By the time he reached me and started to complain, I felt that it was best just to get them out of camp and back to town. When he stales that I became more agitated, it was because he kept changing the story. I did halt the conversation by telling him I didn't appreciate him lying and finalized the paper work, and got them on their way. I did charge them what was due for the flights, which is actually beside the point because whatever the costs are, the hunter has agreed to pay.

It is not the outfit's fault that commercial flights are missed and/or clients decide to leave camps early incurring additional charges. That is why in the contracts, and again in the final letter, it is specified that their $600.00 is to cover a round trip flight from Fort St. John to camp and return on their scheduled dates. In their case two non-scheduled flights were used. They paid for one to me, and the other directly to North Caribou Air.

In conclusion to the complaint that has been filed, I would like to say that we tried to provide the best service to the Patrick's that was requested by the booking agency. We also responded to Atcheson's when the letter was received and was told not to respond to it. At that point we felt that correspondence was being taken care of by them directly. We were also informed by them at that time that the clients had called their office to complain that they thought they had been booked on a boat goat hunt in Alaska, instead of the horseback goat hunt in British Columbia that they actually came on. This raises some questions as to what went on from the beginning in their minds. I find it hard to believe that they thought they were going to Alaska after booking their tickets to Fort St. John and speaking to me directly on the status and types of conditions to expect while on their "horseback hunt".

---------------------------------------------------------------------- NEW DOCUMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------

To: The Hunting Report From: Dan Flemin Re: Hunt With Timothy and Stuart Patrick Date: May 10, 2001

I would like to submit this statement on my behalf regarding the letters received from Stuart and Tim Patrick.

My name is Dan Fremlin and I am twenty-one years old. I have been employed by Kevin Olmstead for over a year. During the fall hunting season of 2000 I worked for Kevin at his Whitewater Camp. I started the season wrangling and building a log cabin. All of my free time was spent accompanying guides and clients on their hunts. On several occasions I spotted the game, and organized the stalk, and succeeded in harvesting the animals that we were after. Once I became confident in my skills and had learned the country, Kevin assigned me a client of my own.

My first client was Tim Patrick. He arrived at Whitewater and we were informed that both he and his brother were in their 60's and not of great health, therefore would not be physically able to climb up and down mountains in search of goats.

So our plan was to spot from the valley floors and find a good billy in an accessible location to suit their limitations. We had left alone a specific area for just such an occasion. This area is called the pass which we trail through on our way to and from White Water, The advantage of hunting such an area is that you can ride to a much greater elevation than other places and cut out a lot of extra hiking. Myself, Pat, Tim and Stuart left Whitewater and set up camp in the pass. The first evening we did some spotting then went to bed early. The next day we left our camp and rode to the top of the pass. We glassed all the different mountains and in the afternoon spotted a good billy in an accessible spot. It was too late in the day to start a stalk so we left the area as not to spook him away. Everyone was excited and Stuart discussed who was to go after it. They decided that it was a good one for Tim and we would head out first thing the next morning to hunt it. Stuart and Pat would ride back to Whitewater fill up on supplies and head down the valley to hunt. Tim and I found the goat early in the morning and he was bedded down on a ridge just below some cliffs. Because of the shape of the mountain it was an easy stalk and we had good cover for most of the way. The climb took six hours from when we left the horses until we reached shooting range. By myself it would have been no more than an hour. During the hike I carried my backpack, his backpack, and his rifle. When he got ward I carried his coat and hat as well. When we reached shooting range I picked a spot between boulders and set up a rest for his gun. Then we waited for a clear shot. We were less than 200 yards. The billy was grazing directly above us, He stood broadside and peered off the ridge in the opposite direction of us. I could see from the tips of his horns to the tips of his feet. I whispered over and over for him to shoot but he kept fidgeting and squinting through his scope. While he squirmed around he knocked some rocks loose and they started rolling down the mountain. This didn't faze the goat until Tim lost his balance and slid back about two feet. He dropped his gun and started making a big commotion. This attracted the goat's attention. When I looked up he was looking right at us I tried to push Tim up and grab his gun but it too late. The billy was on the move straight up the cliff. By the time Tim regained his composure the goat was a small white dot. I told him to forget about it. He said he wanted to shoot, but I said not to and he then shot anyways. The goat walked behind a ledge and we could not see him anymore. Tim thought he hit it but I was sure he hadn't. I climbed up to check though and found no sign of blood, or a dead goat. It was getting late so we started to back down the mountain. Tim had lost his bearings and said we were going the wrong way. He had no idea where he was or how he had got there. It took me some time to pursue him to the right direction. We went back to White Water the next day and Tim was very sore and very tired. Stuart and Pat were there when we arrived. They had spotted a billy behind camp, but the weather had turned bad. They decided to sit it out instead of going after him. Tim and I rested up that evening and we all hung out in the cookshak playing dice and telling jokes. The next day Tim and I rode out to Ipec Lake, a very beautiful spot, and had lunch and did some glassing. We saw goats on many different mountains and I said we could set up a camp and hunt from there. His answer was "there is no way in Hell I could climb up those mountains." From then on we would go riding during the day and we would see goats here and there. In the evenings we would go to the swamp and watch moose and elk going through. Then we would go back and play more dice and laugh at each other and then go to bed. It was a little depressing for me being my first hunt, but I have had better luck since then. As for all of his complaints, there was always great food. Ann is an unbelievable camp cook and they ate like pigs at every meal. The cabin had just been finished a week earlier and was very damp inside with fresh logs and moss as chinking. When we lit a fire it got real hot and water condensed on the ceiling. It needed more time to dry out, and they said that they would be fine without fire, because it got too hot inside for them to sleep. Myself and the other two guides slept in a tent without a stove for the whole season and were always comfy. Pat and I had been working together for over six months and had nicknames for each other. I never thought that would be too informal for a hunting camp. They knew our real names but chose themselves to address up by our aliases. All of their previous hunting trips they talked about were disasters. From terrible weather to terrible guides to nothing but oatmeal for breakfast, lunch and dinner, and guides getting drunk and shooting at planes. So I myself believe they came into it expecting the worse. They are the ones responsible for everything being horrible. I also believe if they shot a goat it would have been the best trip of their lives. Pat and I each got a $400.00US tip from them and plenty of "good byes" and "you were great". They said it was tough luck and we did an excellent job and that they would keep trying for a mountain goat.

The Olmstead's run a high-class operation and have a great crew and a great hunting territory. I don't know what goal the Patricks were going for when they wrote these letters, but it makes me sick to my stomach to read them. It is a complete slander and a waste of your and my time

---------------------------------------------------------------------- NEW DOCUMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------

To: The Hunting Report From: Anne Weibe Re: Hunt with Mr. Timothy and Stuart Patrick Date: May 10, 2001

To whom it may concern in regards to the letter received by Kevin Olmstead from Tim and Stuart Patrick.

My name is Anne Weibe I am 23 years old and have been employed with Kevin Olmstead for the past year. I was the cook up at White Water when Tim and Stuart hunted with the Olmsteads. I wa really quite shocked when Kevin shared the letter he received from the Patricks with me. When the Patricks' left our camp it was with big smiles and many thanks for everything from the cooking to guiding to all the fun evenings we spent together.

I sincerely believe that all of us treated the Patricks with all the respect, humility and kindness that they, as our guests, deserved. I was under the impression that they truly had a wonderful time; yes they were disappointed that they were unsuccessful in killing a goat, but that is to be expected. Every hunter has his heart set on a kill. The Patricks were always most grateful for all of the meals I prepared and they ate with a vigorous appetite. Never once did I have rancid meat or not enough food to go around. Kevin and Victoria are very good about making sure every camp has lots of food and always fresh food. Yes, they ate elk and moose meat that had not been harvested in our camp. All of the elk and moose meat was sent to us by the Olmsteads who have all of their meat professionally butchered in Fort St. John. All of the meat comes into our camps frozen and when kept in the ice-cold river it is always fresh. I personally gave the meat to the guides for their spike camping trips and it was not rancid. I am very confused as to what made the Patrick's come up with these accusations. As far as the guides go they had the best of the best. Both guides have a very positive and professional attitude and they tried their best to get these guys their goats. Both Tim and Stuart enjoyed their guides immensely, and had nothing but praise for them ever. So once again these are false accusations here. We had many wonderful evenings together playing cards telling jokes, laughing and just enjoying each other's company. The Olmstead's run a very professional and highly successful business here and their biggest goal is to keep their hunters comfortable and happy. Both Kevin and Victoria demonstrate a great love for hunting which is apparent to all of us who are employed with them.

So in closing I would just like to say that the Patricks seem to be very undecided whether they are having an enjoyable time or not. They seem to have two very different opinions and their opinions to us were everything was awesome. We all did a great job and we all parted on great terms. I am not sure what happened but I honestly believe that everything they said was lies and we are all wasting our time with this. This is an awesome operation and everyone who is here as an employee or as a guest always having a lot of fun.

---------------------------------------------------------------------- NEW DOCUMENT ---------------------------------------------------------------------

To: Timothy Patrick From: Kevin Olmstead Re: Hunting Trip Date: June 27, 2001

In response to the conversations with Mr. Ray Jackson, we are providing the following breakdown regarding the refund on your non-scheduled charter flight to camp, and your license, tags, and non-resident hunt preservation fund fees.

Non-Scheduled Charter Flight Total Cost US$650.00 per person. We have divided the total cost for the flight by three (you, Stuart and Prophet Muskwa). For total refund of US$216.67.

You paid as US$427.50 for your license and tags and non-resident hunt preservation fund, the total cost in Canadian dollars was CD$495.90. At the 2000 exchange rate of .6733 the value of CD$495.90 in US dollars is US$333.89, so we will refund you the difference of: US$93.61

Total check enclosed: US$310.28.



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